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20121101
20121130
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. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers h
. >> thank you upon >> brown: and now to the conflict in syria. nato said today that it would consider a turkish request to deploy patriot missiles to protect itself from syrian attacks. turkey and syria share a 560 mile border and after syrian mortar rounds landed in turkish territory, concerns have risen that the civil war fighting could spread further. in margaret warner's latest report, she examines the spill-over that's already happening. >> reporter: nestled up against the border with syria, ceylanpinar, turkey has an all- too-up-close view of the civil war next door, as fighting rages in its syrian twin city of ras- al-ain. for days last week on the syrian side, president bashar al assad's forces fought rebels of the free syrian army, or f.s.a., to control ras-al-ain. terrified syrian civilians scrambled, some over razor wire, into ceylanpinar. the f.s.a. finally took over the syrian town, but not before badly fraying nerves in its turkish neighbor. turk abdulazziz guven said he'd had to rescue his cousins from the syrian side. >> ( translated ): the fight started at 3:00. at 7:
's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation.
-- laura trevelyan. searching for a better life outside syria, some pretty gee's find themselves in limbo, now fighting for basic needs. is there life beyond earth? we will tell you about the frigid spider. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. for 60 -- six days in egypt, the protesters have been demanding the president to give up his sweeping powers. the judge's claim the new president is seeking bloody revenge. as both sides digging in, is there any end in sight? >> pensions are rising between president morsi and the egyptian judiciary. some protests over him giving himself extensive new powers. the spokesman says the president has joined in the campaign against the court. >> the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized by any threat or blackmail, and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone come on a matter how forcible the pressure. we are ready to face this, whatever the consequences. >> meanwhile, the final draft of egypt's new constitution is said to be on the verge of completion. in tahri
. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet network has been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles
assad vows to live and die in syria, striking a violent note as the violence continues. and born into indian royalty, she risk her life behind enemy lines during world war ii. today she is finally honored for sacrifice. >> welcome to our viewers on public television and also around the globe and. tonight, the princess is installing the menu are going to leave china -- the process to install the men who are going to lead and china is under way. the outgoing china -- the outgoing president told them the correction is so-called -- so bad in china it could threaten leadership of the state. >> two days after america elected its president, china has begun the process of anointing its next leader. but no election here, instead, 2000 communist party delegates, including many from the army gathered for their progress. .hina's 1.3 billion people the communist party has reform in china, but not in a normal way. it is an anomaly. is an authoritarian regime running the world's second- biggest economy. modern leaders paying homage to pass commonness, mouse at all -- mao tse tung included. >> w
rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming across the border. turkish ambulances were standing by to cope. with 120,000 refugees in camps i
. >> there will be demonstrations in the streets tomorrow. we will be following that as well. joining me. or now to syria where the rebel- held area of the baskets claims that he -- of damascus claims that government forces bombed a playground full of children. the shell landed near a refugee camp where nearly 12,000 are living in awful conditions. >> atma camp, for 12,000 people this is as far away from the war they can get. it is wet and cold, even before the winter has really set in. sewage mixes with mud after it rains. for some, the temporary home has become permanent. they are stopped. this place sprung up overnight when people fleeing to turkey arrived at the border fence and could not go any further. the war in syria is binding on. in a typical week the the 1000 people are killed. many more families are making the same journey only to end up here. >> in northern syria has seen some of the worst atrocities of the war. they have come through a terrible ordeal to reach atma. in this group of tents, we found survivors of one area where 110 people are said to have died there. 145-year-old man lost four bro
is likely to change and where do you think syria is headed at this moment, although we have shifted our focus to this conflict between israel and hamas? dennis? >> what are the options that present themselves? >> look, i think syria is .. headed to a failed state which is nobody's interest in the region, and i think the key at this point is, for us to find a way to do more. you will already seeing the effort to build a more credible opposition. >> rose: right. >> now i think what is needed is also to ensure that the balance of power within that opposition is one that doesn't favor the radical islamists instead it means finding a way to get material support both nonlethal and lethal assistance to those who are more secular, who are submitted to an inclusive future for syria, who are committed to, in fact, a much more democratic future for syria. i think it is almost inevitable that we and others internationally are going to do more to build up the opposition because the alternative is to see a failed state where the kind of conflict you see within syria more and more begins not only to
, a courageous fight made her a target. tens of thousands are urging peace for the young girl. one of syria's main opposition groups, the national council has elected a new leader. he vowed to work with others to accelerate the fall of what he calls a criminal regime. united nations says a 11,000 refugees have fled syria in 24 hours. >> aid agencies are warning it could be a catastrophe in syria. in the last few hours, the numbers fleeing have increased dramatically. >> in the last 24 hours alone, we have received 11,000 refugees have fled to neighboring countries. this is the highest number we have received so far, and it is one of the highest we have had for quite some time. >> 2.5 million people need aid, but many are receiving nothing. the relief operation is hampered by violence, a lack of funds and a lack of staff. the conflict is spreading. the u.s. expects the numbers to rise to 4 million by the start of next year. >> the solution is in the hands of politicians. they exclusively are of a political nature. >> agencies are stressing they can't be the answer for people to receive any g
this through. newmembers of syria's opposition coalition are seeking former role recognition of the west and held talks in london. it said they still needed to submit plans for a political solution. it said britain would offer its support. our diplomatic correspondent has the latest. >> a regime bombing run in northern syria. this act of this video shows the bombs falling. it is the latest evidence of an unequal war that opposition rebels are convinced they can win. fighters of the free syrian army insists they are taking ground. but opposition leaders have been greatly hampered by deep divisions until now. which is what makes these pictures so significant. the new opposition coalition to discuss ways that britain can strengthen their hand. first, the government needed assurances from the opposition leader. >> i welcome the commitment he has made to reach out to all opposition groups and communities and to respect human rights, to finalize a clear plan for political transition in syria, and of course to demonstrate how the coalition can be a credible political alternative to the upside r
. but these are some of the lucky ones. having escaped the fighting in syria, they face a different challenge. in jordan, the winter can bring miracle dangers with heavy rain and subzero temperatures. thousands of children do not have the necessary shelter or clothing to ensure survival. >> they love their country. they are displaced refugees. they did not -- they came in summertime. they have nothing for winter. they need to be prepared for winter. >> save the children warrants to hundred thousand old rubles children could be among those that struggle the most. many have fled over the syrian border in a variety of direction. there are 2 million others displaced in the country. more are expected to escape. this was the border in northern syria today. it is those that do not reach the care of international agencies for whom the danger is greatest. save the children says some refugees have not been able to watch for more than a fortnight because the only water is ice cold. that brings concerns about sanitation and disease. inside syria, fighting continues to rage. the 400,000 serious -- syrians
. >> syria rebels claimed another victory at a extended their control and a strategic region. >> bringing truth and reconciliation in an era of forced -- [indiscernible] and welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. the leaders of the european are embarking on what could be a difficult round of negotiations on a long-term budget. they are looking for a deal stretching to 2020, but they are divided on the best way to go. certain countries have been calling for cuts, more current spending levels maintained or even increased. >> as the leaders swept into brussels, the question was, had they come to argue or agree on a seven-year budget? all eyes were on david cameron regarded as the potential spoiler, the leader that insists on a cut. >> to keep the british rebate. >> the prime minister was in the see the key european officials to make his case. a 15 minute meeting became 35 and the prediction after words was a long ways to go. other leaders were arriving at their message was to be ready to compromise. >> they all have some preconditions and they must
fled syria a month ago. the young and the old have lost their country. 2-year-old lauren suffers from the blood disease hemophelia. in the war, health services have collapsed. >> this room is too small, and there are seven of us living here. my son is sick, and that affects all of us. my hope is to go to a european country and take care of my soften. all i am asking for is treatment for my son. >> but the short sea journey to europe can be pirro luis. in august nearly 60 people drowned, mostly women and children, drowned when a smuggler's boat overturned. >> he has asked us not to show his face. he is haunted by what happened. >> i saw people under the war. a woman and child tried to cling to me. people were all over each other and drowning. there was a little boy on the boat and i talked to him and said i would take care of him in europe. but he drowned. >> here, the shortest crossing to greece is just eight kilometers. the gateway to europe is close. having sold everything they own, many of the refugees are paying up to 5,000 pounds, their entire life savings, to try and escape to e
is that hamas is further away from iran and from syria. the more radical governments in the region. closer to egypt and qatar who are less radical, more western oriented, more pro-american and with open channels to israel. >> rose: so what do you think is going to happen? >> i think a new cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen within the next 24 hours to prevent and avoid and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cast and then whoever takes the place of jabbarry as the new leader of hamas will have to impose a cease-fire. while at the same time israel will have to let go some of its blockade of gaza. and i think both sides will try the best face-saving formulas which they can deploy in that situation. >> rose: aluf, thank you so much for joining us. >> good evening. >> rose: aluf benn is the executive editor-in-chief of the israeli newspaper "ha'aretz." we'll be back in a moment. stay with us. >> rose: the fallout from the benghazi attack tonights, the death of chris stevens and three other americans were blamed on a spontaneous reaction to a video. it became clear
: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> intel >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for
joined him in applause. a pair of suicide car bombers in syria blew themselves up today in a suburb of damascus. at least 34 people were killed. the twin explosions shattered buildings and left streets littered with rubble. in addition to the dead, the state news agency reported dozens of people were wounded. meanwhile, in the north, rebels said they shot down a government fighter jet with an anti- aircraft missile. in egypt, the political crisis took a new turn, as two top appellate courts went on strike against president mohammed morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the pric
on in syria, other parts of the region, all the while, the gulf arabs, especially, feeling menaced by the events in iran. it is complicated. they're a lot of intersecting conflicts. i do think the immediate task must be to stabilize the situation, to reduce the violence, to bring about to an immediate cease-fire. one similar to what has gone 9 for many years. >> -- gone on for many years. >> thank you for joining us from new york. the cia has opened an investigation into the conduct of its former director david petraeus who resigned last week over an extramarital affair. an agency spokesman says the investigation is exploratory and does not presuppose any particular outcome. he is scheduled to testify tomorrow in front of lawmakers on the attack in benghazi. president obama has pledged ongoing federal support for areas struggling to recover after a storm sandy. he went to new york for the first time with the devastation and that with families, officials, and first responders. it has been 2.5 years since an explosion on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico killed 11 people and unleashed
. but first, with the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> woodruff: the violence in syria swept up a new group today. fighting raged near a palestinian refugee camp in southern damascus. activists said palestinian radicals supporting the syrian government were battling other palestinians. elsewhere in the capital, a car packed with explosives detonated in a main square, killing at least 11 people. the blast heavily damaged nearby buildings, and littered the streets with charred debris. and in the central province of hama, a suicide car bomb killed at least 50 syrian soldiers and gunmen. across greece today, services ground to a halt in the face of a new protest against austerity measures. the governing coalition presented its latest package to parliament, $17 billion in spending cuts and tax hikes. in response, transport workers, journalists, doctors, and many shopkeepers stopped work for 48 hours. many showed up for marches in athens to show their opposition. trading was light on wall street today ahead of the presidential election. the dow jones industrial average gained 19 po
and womanizer. diplomatic efforts to end the civil war in syria entered a new phase today, hours after news of president obama's re-election flashed around the world. british officials announced they will begin dealing directly with syrian rebel leaders, and they urged the u.s. to join them. and turkey confirmed it's in talks with nato allies, including the u.s., to create a safe zone inside syria. one plan would deploy patriot missiles just inside turkey, to protect civilians in the safe zone. those are some of the day's major storieow, back to judy. >> woodruff: the president secured a second term thanks in part to building a massive ground game, coupled with an early investment in negative television ads defining romney. to get a better understanding of how mr. obama did it, and for an inside look at what hindered romney's campaign, we talk with ascts of the race.covering they are philip rucker of "the washington post, who has been traveling with romney all year. carol lee of the "wall street journal," who covers the white house. and slate columnist sasha issenberg, author of the book, "
. but first, the other news of the day. in syria, rebel fighters gained more momentum in the east today. they seized a key army base at mayadeen and took control of its artillery stockpiles. to the north, syrian government warplanes flattened a building next to a hospital in aleppo overnight. at least 15 people were killed. the airstrikes damaged one of the last remaining sources of medical aid for civilians there. a taliban suicide bomber killed 23 people in a procession of shi-ite muslims in pakistan. the attack happened near midnight when the bomber tried to join a religious gathering in rawalpindi. at least 62 people were wounded, including six policemen. this is the latest in a string of bombings targeting shi-ites during their holiest month of the year. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. defended her first account of the attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice has come under fire by critics who say she gave misleading information about the nature of the attack and the motive behind it. but at the u.n. in new york last night she said that was not the case. >> when discu
than 80 people have been killed in another day of intense violence in syria. a car bomb ripped through a predominantly pro-government area of the capital, damascus, killing 11 people and injuring several dozen. opposition activists reported several government air strikes including one which they say killed 14 civilians. a u.s. army soldier accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in a drunken rampage in march is facing a preliminary hearing to determine if there is sufficient evidence for a court marshall. the sergeant is accused of leaving his base under cover of darkness and opening fire on civilians in at least two villages. several bombs have gone off in the bahraini capital killing two ex pat yot workers and killing a third. the blast was killed by five home-made devices. the state news agency described the explosions as acts of terrorism. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, fighting it out in florida. the u.s. presidential candidates pull out all the stops to win over this state. that's so pivotal with the voters. >> now to the chilling sto
of syria for decades. in china, a government think tank urged leadership to end the country's one-child policy. it recommends each family be allowed to have two children by 2015, and by 2020 all limits be dropped. the one-child policy was introduced in 1980 to help curb china's population growth. but it's been widely unpopular and led to imbalances, both between boys and girls and the nation's aging population and its labor force. letitia baldrige, the author and etiquette maven, has died at a nursing home outside washington. she had severe osteoarthritis and cardiac complications. baldrige served as first lady jacqueline kennedy's chief of staff, planning state dinners and social gatherings at the white house. later, "time" magazine hailed her the arbiter of "new american manners" for defining etiquette for the workplace. letitia baldrige was 86 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we take up a question that is being discussed in the wake of the hurricane. should cities and states start making bigger changes to prepare for the
on board. most were rescued, but five remained missing. in syria, rebels killed 28 government soldiers in a series of attacks in the northern part of the country. anti-regime activists said gun battles erupted at three military checkpoints surrounding the city of saraqeb in idlib province. the checkpoints line major supply routes to aleppo, the country's largest city and a major battleground. the ousted president of penn state university graham spanier will face cover-up charges in a child sex abuse scandal. prosecutors today filed counts of perjury, obstruction and failing to report suspected abuse. in addition, they added counts against athletic director timothy curley, and gary schultz, a former penn state vice president. the scandal revolved around jerry sandusky, the former assistant football coach now in federal prison for sexually abusing young boys. october turned out to be a big month for u.s. auto sales. figures out today showed toyota led the way with a sales gain of almost 16%. chrysler reported its best october since 2007 with a 10% increase. g.m. sales were up 5%, while f
are in the presidential palace, you have to deal with a raging civil war in syria and an israeli government that, you know, no one knows basically who is the majority anymore let alone xab what it stands for. so this is not a great time to be secretary of state. i've said if you want to do national security in this country ask to be secretary of education. >> rose: thank you for joining us. see you tomorrow night captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed yasser arafat's tomb for a second time. a dignified ceremony. the palestinian's lost leader has not been allowed to rest peacefully. shielded by blue screens, scientists took samples from his body to try to clear up a near decade of conjecture on the spf theory that says that when a gravely ill arafat said farewell to his
the whole international community." in syria, internet access and most phone service was blocked for a second day. opposition activists blamed the regime. government officials insisted rebels were behind the outage. meanwhile, fighting continued in and around damascus, but government troops managed to reopen the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virginia. manning says his treatment there was so harsh, the charges should be dismissed. the military says manning was a suicide risk, so jailers kept him isolated and took away his clothes. the holders of half of that record powerball jackpot of $588 million came forward today in missouri. a 52-year-old mechanic, mark hill, and his wife cindy were introduced in dearborn, just north of kansas city. cindy hill sai
, "okay, you have to play a role in iran and syria or whatever, being responsible." domestically, we want them to gain confidence so they don't have to have their foot on their people's neck. most of the time in china you don't know the government's around. just kind of a sort of state of chaos -- >> really? >> and, yeah. >> i mean, not like russia, the soviet union -- >> oh, it's -- >> not that blanket -- >> entirely different. it's most of the time the areas the government cares about, the internet, democratic protest or whatever, taiwan, tibet, they're all over. when it doesn't involve that, you know, you can basically do what you want. you start a business, et cetera. so we want them to allow their people to have more a sort of liberal, normal life, as times goes on, which i -- and the government it's a country becoming more confident with a government that's still sort of nervous antique. it's a dick cheney government with, if not a barack obama, an fdr type nation behind it. here's an illustration. before the olympics, the foreign ministry said, "we're going to have an authorized pr
turn to the other hot conflict in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don't. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)